Failover Cluster – An error was encountered while loading the network topology

Sharing and friendly reminder for myself as I will for sure run into this problem again in the future.

When creating a Windows Failover Cluster, you get this error message (btw, did you know you can Ctrl+C copy the text from a dialog box and paste like this);


Solution: In this case I had to remove the User Account from AD’s “Protected Users” group because Failover Cluster is still using NTLM and CredSSP. Relogon and it’s now possible to create the cluster, and then just add the user back into the Protected Users Group.

Using Azure DNS for Dynamic DNS with PowerShell

I’ve been using DynDNS and other Free DNS Services for  some time, but as they are getting harder and harder to use for free. Like you need to remember to logon and click a button once a month and what not. I figured it was time to migrate to Azure DNS instead. Being able to use PowerShell to handle my DNS together with everything I’ve already automated makes my life so much easier. And as I’ve already got a couple of domains and some Azure subscriptions there was more or less no increased cost for me.  As you can see in the picture, Azure DNS Pricing is really cheap.

I’ve used Task Scheduler to scheduled the script below to run at Computer Startup on one of my Hyper-V Hosts at home, and then every hour. That guarantees that if there is a power failure and I get a new IP from my ISP, when the server boots, the external DNS pointers will be updated at once and just to be sure check every hour.

In short, the script checks your External IP and compares that to the IP of the hostname you want updated. If they are not identical, it will logon to Azure and update the hostname with your current IP.
Simple as that.

In my case, I’ve setup a UserName in AzureDNS who has access to just that DNSZone and are using that UserName in the script.


You obviously need to migrate an existing or register a new DNS Zone to Azure and use Microsoft’s NameServers for this to work.


How to solve EVENT ID 1202 SceCli 0x57 Parameter is incorrect

Customer is repeatedly getting this Event ID on all Servers and Clients, especially on the Domain Controllers being logged every 5 minute.

Searching for that Error gives thousands of results, most less helpful.The way I solved this problem was like this.

  1. On one of the servers having the problem, run RSOP.MSC
  2. Resultant Set of Policies showed a Warning on the Computer policies. Selecting properties there showed the same error as in our Event Log.
  3. Browsing the Tree showed that there were a problem in the Password Policy section, from the Default Domain Policy.
  4. Which were also visible in GPMC (Group Policy Management Console)
  5. By modifying the Default Domain Policy and fixing the bad entries (no clue how they got there). The Error message (and problem) is now gone.






Get GeoLocation with PowerShell and set NTP Server in a GPO

Using Powershell to locate your Geographical Location with the help of GeoLocation (IP-Address) is quite easy, cool and useful!

When we build Private and Hybrid Clouds across the globe in various countries and continents I want to make sure the Active Directory PDC Emulator is using a valid time source based on that location.

GeoLocation with Powershell

So with this small script (it’s using multiple WebServices to cycle through until it gets an answer) we can get a rough location for where we are and in my case it’s usually enough to know what country the datacenter is in.

That can then be used as you see fit. Though for me, I’m using it to update the Group Policy being applied to the PDC Emulator to point to the country specific NTP Pool with the generic pool as backup value.

That’s how easy it’s to modify a Group Policy object.

Please share any solutions using GeoLocation in the comments. It might give me some nice new ideas too!


How to delete files in a userprofile with Group Policy Preferences

As a follow up to my post about How to automatically Hide “Configure this local server” in Server Manager. I mentioned it’s possible to remove the individual user.config files in various ways to reset the behavior and hide the Welcome Tile. You can easily do that with a GPO like this;


It’s a Group Policy being applied to all Server Admins utilizing Group Policy Preferences to delete two files (one for Windows Server 2012R2 and one for Windows Server 2016). But it’s only doing it once to make sure that if a admin does any changes to the file it won’t be deleted again. The idea is that it will be deleted once to reset settings to the one in ServerManager.exe.config but not repeatedly after that if the administrator saves any other changes.


How to automatically Hide “Configure this local server” in Server Manager

After you have installed a couple of hundred servers, you may start to feel that you have seen this text a couple of times too many and start to wonder how to get rid of it…

Hide Welcome Tile

You can obviously click the “Hide” button to hide the “Configure this local server” box, which is also called “Welcome Tile”.

Show Welcome Tile

And if you would ever want to get it back, you can find it in the “View Menu”. BUT… How do you disable the Welcome Tile by default for all users?

There is unfortunately no GPO (Group Policy) to control that. Just to set if Server Manager should auto-start or not. Which does not help in this case.

The settings in Server Manager is stored in a version folder in this location:

The configuration for Server Manager is stored in a file called user.config with the interesting bits highlighted here;


So you want to Modify the “WelcomeTileVisibility” setting in that file which can be done in numerous ways. But a easier solution is to just name and copy a file with this content to that folder.


That file only contains new default WelcomeTileVisibility setting, hiding the Welcome tile for you when you launch Server Manager. And if you do any changes in Server Manager, the new settings will be saved to that file too.

But that’s a per user setting and it has to be copied to the profile after it’s been created etc etc. Making it all a bit more complicated.
Luckily there is a better and easier way to do it, where you also help your co-workers at the same time!

In your reference image, or in your Server deployment script or with PowerShell or with Group Policies or any other way you find worthy. Just use the same information as above, but save it in this path to be machine wide;

Hide Welcome Tile for everyone

Notice that it’s still the exact same content of the file;

But it’s now stored together with the ServerManager.exe file in the system32 folder making it server wide. It’s a lot easier to copy it there just once so it’s applied to everyone rather than try to get the config file into each persons profile.

Notice: If you already have a user.config file in your Profile, it may override the settings from serverManager.exe.config so delete your user.config file to verify your new setup is working as expected.

In our environment, we are deploying the file in our Server Deployment solution, and also copying it to all server with a Group Policy Preference just in case someone installed a server manually for some unknown reason.


Error 500 in Azure Pack when using ADFS

I’ve had a couple of customers lately who’s had sudden issues with Azure Pack reporting a error 500 when used in combination with ADFS after logging on.

It’s because the ADFS Certificate has been updated and the thumbprint in WAP doesn’t match the one presented from ADFS anymore.

Mark has made a great post about it here (all credits to him for the solution): Error 500 Azure Pack tenant portal – Jwt10329 Error

I’ve modified Mark’s script a little bit so I can easily run it at various customers without modifying the URL’s. It will basically read the old value from the config and re-use that hostname for the ADFS dns entry.

This script assumes you are using ADFS for both the tenant and admin sites.

Just update the HOST, Username and Password and run the script on the AdminSite server. When done, logon to AzurePack as normal.


Enable driver verifier for all none-microsoft drivers with powershell

I’ve been doing some debugging for a customer, who has multiple industrial Client PC’s who are rebooting regularly. And to get more information in the memory dumps I had a need to configure the system to do a complete memory dump but also to enable extra verification of all drivers in the system to find the cause of the bluescreens.

Window has a built in tool called “Verifier” where you can enable extra checks on calls done by specific drivers. You generally don’t want to enable it on all drivers as that will slow down the system notable. And truthfully, the number of times it’s a Microsoft device driver who’s causing the issue is so small, because they check and stress test their drivers so much better than all the other vendors. Thus, it’s always better to enable the extra checks for all drivers, except the ones from Microsoft to start with.

As I didn’t want to run around to all the Client PC’s and configure verifier, I’ve made a small powershell script that reads the name of all none-microsoft drivers from the system and enabled verification for just those drivers. Which can then be execute in any number of ways.

It’s using both the Get-VMIObject and Get-WindowsDrivers to get a complete list of thirdparty drivers in the system. And it will also configure the system for a Complete Memory Dump.

Just to be safe, I’ve added /bootmode resetonbootfail so it will reset the verifier settings in case the system is bluescreening during boot due to verifier notificing a bad driver in the boot process.

Reboot the PC, get a big cold Coke and wait for the bluescreen to happen.

Should the image contain hotfixes or not?

One more post in my WSUS/Hotfix series of blogposts. I’ve been asked a couple of times how we approve Hotfixes and if we include them in the images.

I’ve made an Autoapproval Rule where we approve all Hotfixes automatically to the various Computer Groups with a Deadline, like this.


And this is how the details looks like;


First of all, any server that could cause problems if it automatically rebooted doesn’t have a Deadline, thats servers like Hyper-V Hosts and SOFS Nodes. Those servers are managed by SCVMM’s (System Center Virtual Machine Manager) Patch Management. VMM has a feature to put a cluser node in maintenance mode, automatically drain the node of VM’s, patch it, and then bring the node back online again before it takes the next node.  So we handle all patching of clustered servers from SCVMM. While we let the WSUS Client handle all other servers. We might add SCCM to the mix some day and let it handle all of the servers, but as most of our customers don’t want to run SCCM to manage their Fabric, this is the way we do it now.

By putting a deadline, we know the hotfix will be installed sooner or later. And if there is a Patch Tuesday before that date, it will also install the hotfixes at the same time.

Notice that the hotfix is NOT approved for All Computers and NOT for Unassigned Computers. How come?

When we build a VM image for any OS, it’s done automatically through MDT. Those VM’s are ending up in Unassigned Computers as they don’t have a role yet and we don’t want any Hotfixes in the images. Of course, if there is a mandatory hotfix whish is needed to make the image or deploy it, that one will be included!

The reasons we don’t want any hotfixes in an image is quite simple if you think about it. There are two main reasons really.
The first one is that if we make an image in august, which contains hotfixes. When we deploy that image 3 months later, there is a big chance that the hotfix we had in the image is replaced by a proper update from Microsoft so there was no use for the hotfix in the first place.
Second, when we create an image, we don’t add Clustering, Hyper-V and other roles and features to the image, right? So Windows will then only install the hotfixes for the core OS. And when the image is later deployed and someone adds the Hyper-V Role, it would install hotfixes for that role then. So the server wouldn’t be fully patched anyway so adding 5 or 15 hotfixes automatically after deployment doesn’t really make much of a difference.
Third, a minor reason is also that we normally use the same images for Fabric, Workload and Tenants and we like to keep them quite generic.

Here is a great blogpost about making reference images from my colleague Mikael Nystrom.


Semi-Automatic Hotfix import into WSUS

One of my blogreaders, Andreas Fjellner, came up with a way to make the import of hotfixes a bit faster than copy and paste.

You can download a XML file with all the Hotfixes I’ve got imported so you don’t have to do a findstr or excel filtering from the previous blogpost, the XML file contains the same list as shown here List of Private Cloud related Hotfixes – 2016-02-03

Download: XML File (notice the Download button at the top so you don’t have to copy and paste). Save the file as c:\temp\details.xml on your WSUS Server and then run this script;

It will spawn one internet explorer for each Hotfix with the correct URL. Just click ADD to basket. Close the IE Window and pick the next window.
When you are done with the first batch of 20 hotfixes, use the “Import updates” link as described here: Importing Hotfixes and Drivers directly into WSUS and you will now be able to import all hotfixes into your WSUS. And now press Y in the powershell window to take the next batch of hotfixes. Repeat until done.

Another way is to use AutoIT to make a script that moves the mouse and clicks on the right place doing the import semi-automatic, as another blogreader pointed out. There is always a way!