How to set DPM Azure Throttling with Powershell

When you set the System Center DPM setting for Azure throttling via GUI, you have to do the full wizard and also enter the azure passphrase to save the settings.

If you happen to not have the key handy or for some other reason want to do it via Powershell, here is the command.

Easy as that, but I couldn’t find any examples on Microsoft Docs, just how to disable throttling. The script sets the settings as in the screenshot above, you might want to adjust the bandwidth etc, it’s defined in bits.

Use DHCP Scope info to build DNS Reverse Lookup Zones and configure DNS with Powershell

I had a customer with more than 60 DHCP Scopes but all DNS Reverse Lookup Zones were unfortunately not created, configured and/or consisted of a lot of old invalid static records. And in addition both the Primary and Reverse Zones were containing a lot of old Name Servers.

Here is the scripts I ran to fix the issues. Just remove the -whatif to actually make it do stuff.

In this case, our Name Servers had the name standard ADM-V-ADDS…. so the script will remove all other name servers. Obviously, modify to fit your environment!



Using Azure DNS for Dynamic DNS with PowerShell

I’ve been using DynDNS and other Free DNS Services for  some time, but as they are getting harder and harder to use for free. Like you need to remember to logon and click a button once a month and what not. I figured it was time to migrate to Azure DNS instead. Being able to use PowerShell to handle my DNS together with everything I’ve already automated makes my life so much easier. And as I’ve already got a couple of domains and some Azure subscriptions there was more or less no increased cost for me.  As you can see in the picture, Azure DNS Pricing is really cheap.

I’ve used Task Scheduler to scheduled the script below to run at Computer Startup on one of my Hyper-V Hosts at home, and then every hour. That guarantees that if there is a power failure and I get a new IP from my ISP, when the server boots, the external DNS pointers will be updated at once and just to be sure check every hour.

In short, the script checks your External IP and compares that to the IP of the hostname you want updated. If they are not identical, it will logon to Azure and update the hostname with your current IP.
Simple as that.

In my case, I’ve setup a UserName in AzureDNS who has access to just that DNSZone and are using that UserName in the script.


You obviously need to migrate an existing or register a new DNS Zone to Azure and use Microsoft’s NameServers for this to work.


Get GeoLocation with PowerShell and set NTP Server in a GPO

Using Powershell to locate your Geographical Location with the help of GeoLocation (IP-Address) is quite easy, cool and useful!

When we build Private and Hybrid Clouds across the globe in various countries and continents I want to make sure the Active Directory PDC Emulator is using a valid time source based on that location.

GeoLocation with Powershell

So with this small script (it’s using multiple WebServices to cycle through until it gets an answer) we can get a rough location for where we are and in my case it’s usually enough to know what country the datacenter is in.

That can then be used as you see fit. Though for me, I’m using it to update the Group Policy being applied to the PDC Emulator to point to the country specific NTP Pool with the generic pool as backup value.

That’s how easy it’s to modify a Group Policy object.

Please share any solutions using GeoLocation in the comments. It might give me some nice new ideas too!


How to automatically Hide “Configure this local server” in Server Manager

After you have installed a couple of hundred servers, you may start to feel that you have seen this text a couple of times too many and start to wonder how to get rid of it…

Hide Welcome Tile

You can obviously click the “Hide” button to hide the “Configure this local server” box, which is also called “Welcome Tile”.

Show Welcome Tile

And if you would ever want to get it back, you can find it in the “View Menu”. BUT… How do you disable the Welcome Tile by default for all users?

There is unfortunately no GPO (Group Policy) to control that. Just to set if Server Manager should auto-start or not. Which does not help in this case.

The settings in Server Manager is stored in a version folder in this location:

The configuration for Server Manager is stored in a file called user.config with the interesting bits highlighted here;


So you want to Modify the “WelcomeTileVisibility” setting in that file which can be done in numerous ways. But a easier solution is to just name and copy a file with this content to that folder.


That file only contains new default WelcomeTileVisibility setting, hiding the Welcome tile for you when you launch Server Manager. And if you do any changes in Server Manager, the new settings will be saved to that file too.

But that’s a per user setting and it has to be copied to the profile after it’s been created etc etc. Making it all a bit more complicated.
Luckily there is a better and easier way to do it, where you also help your co-workers at the same time!

In your reference image, or in your Server deployment script or with PowerShell or with Group Policies or any other way you find worthy. Just use the same information as above, but save it in this path to be machine wide;

Hide Welcome Tile for everyone

Notice that it’s still the exact same content of the file;

But it’s now stored together with the ServerManager.exe file in the system32 folder making it server wide. It’s a lot easier to copy it there just once so it’s applied to everyone rather than try to get the config file into each persons profile.

Notice: If you already have a user.config file in your Profile, it may override the settings from serverManager.exe.config so delete your user.config file to verify your new setup is working as expected.

In our environment, we are deploying the file in our Server Deployment solution, and also copying it to all server with a Group Policy Preference just in case someone installed a server manually for some unknown reason.


DVBLogic channel logos for Kodi

I’ve used Kodi (xbmc) as frontend for my DVBLogic (DVBLink) TV-Server backend. Which is working great, but I wanted to enhance the experience a bit and get channel logos for all my channels to show in the tv-listing and in EPG view.

There were unfortunately no packs of Swedish channel logos available, so I made a small powershell script that reads the channel logo URL’s from the EPG Guides and downloads them to a country specific folder. They can then be assigned in DVBLink to the right channels.

The part that took the longest to make was to find a way to download the latest Windows (Win32) version of XMLTV from Sourceforge.

The Script is Downloading Windows (Win32) version on XMLTV.exe from Sourceforge
It’s then unpacking the Zip file to a Directory in c:\temp\xmltv
It will run XMLTV.EXE with –configure where you will be prompted for a location of the cache and which Channels to download information for. Either manually select each channel you want logos for or select all.
XMLTV.EXE will in the next step download information to tvzon.xml. I’ve set the timespan to 0, to make the download size minimal. Meaning, if you want more EPG data, you may want to change “–days 0” to “–days 14”.
The Script is then rading tvzon.xml and downloads all Logos to a country specific folder, based on the filename.
You can now copy the folder structure into your DVBLink server installation under “Program Files (x86)\DVBLogic\DVBLink\share\channel_logos” and you can keep the folder structure.

Link if you just want to download my pack:



Error 500 in Azure Pack when using ADFS

I’ve had a couple of customers lately who’s had sudden issues with Azure Pack reporting a error 500 when used in combination with ADFS after logging on.

It’s because the ADFS Certificate has been updated and the thumbprint in WAP doesn’t match the one presented from ADFS anymore.

Mark has made a great post about it here (all credits to him for the solution): Error 500 Azure Pack tenant portal – Jwt10329 Error

I’ve modified Mark’s script a little bit so I can easily run it at various customers without modifying the URL’s. It will basically read the old value from the config and re-use that hostname for the ADFS dns entry.

This script assumes you are using ADFS for both the tenant and admin sites.

Just update the HOST, Username and Password and run the script on the AdminSite server. When done, logon to AzurePack as normal.


Enable driver verifier for all none-microsoft drivers with powershell

I’ve been doing some debugging for a customer, who has multiple industrial Client PC’s who are rebooting regularly. And to get more information in the memory dumps I had a need to configure the system to do a complete memory dump but also to enable extra verification of all drivers in the system to find the cause of the bluescreens.

Window has a built in tool called “Verifier” where you can enable extra checks on calls done by specific drivers. You generally don’t want to enable it on all drivers as that will slow down the system notable. And truthfully, the number of times it’s a Microsoft device driver who’s causing the issue is so small, because they check and stress test their drivers so much better than all the other vendors. Thus, it’s always better to enable the extra checks for all drivers, except the ones from Microsoft to start with.

As I didn’t want to run around to all the Client PC’s and configure verifier, I’ve made a small powershell script that reads the name of all none-microsoft drivers from the system and enabled verification for just those drivers. Which can then be execute in any number of ways.

It’s using both the Get-VMIObject and Get-WindowsDrivers to get a complete list of thirdparty drivers in the system. And it will also configure the system for a Complete Memory Dump.

Just to be safe, I’ve added /bootmode resetonbootfail so it will reset the verifier settings in case the system is bluescreening during boot due to verifier notificing a bad driver in the boot process.

Reboot the PC, get a big cold Coke and wait for the bluescreen to happen.

Change MAC Address with PowerShell of a Wireless Adapter

As I mentioned in my post a week ago, I’m commuting each day and there is a 200MB Quota on the Wireless Network. Luckily it’s based on the MAC Address of the WiFi Card, so it’s quite easy to get another 200MB Quota if you want  😉


Here is my small powershell script that automatically Releases the IP Address, set’s a new random MAC Address and Re-Connects to the SSID, all done in a second or two.
Yay! Another 200MB Quota to burn.


I’m using a Window 10 client with Hyper-V, and I’ve created a Virtual NIC for the WiFi adapter, that’s why it’s called ‘vEthernet (External Wi-Fi)’.  But you should be able to use the script with a normal WiFi Adapter too.

I’m using a Virtual WiFi Adapter, to be able to give my Virtual Machines access to internet also when I’m without a LAN.

Here is the script for creating a Virtual WiFi NIC;



Block a Service (BITS) when on Wireless and specific Subnet

I’m commuting by train each day, working. The train has a free wireless network, but it’s limited to 200MB traffic, and is then reduced to snail speed. Luckily, it’s restricted by MAC-Address so it’s quite easy to get another 200MB when you run out 😉
Though, yesterday, I ran out of my 200MB quota in less than 7 minutes, which made me confused. A quick check confirmed what I suspected. Yepp, a new build of Windows 10 – fast ring is being downloaded and eating my quota.

Quick solution; create a Windows Firewall rule that blocks BITS from downloading stuff when on Wireless and using the trains subnet.


Here is the PowerShell syntax to create a similar rule.

Yay! No more problems with eating the quota while on the train.